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Map: Voters Closer to Atlanta Supported TSPLOST

A graphic from the Atlanta Regional Commission shows that the further precincts were from the city, the less residents backed the transportation tax.

The transportation tax that would have raised sales taxes 1 percent over 10 years to fund $8.5 billion worth of  failed in the July 31 primaries .

The final tally was 248,319 (37%) against, and 415,526 (63%) for.

The closer voters were to the city of Atlanta, the more they favored the tax, according to the above map provided by the Atlanta Regional Commission.

In some counties, precincts near interstates appear to have more strongly supported the tax, commonly referred to as TSPLOST. In Cherokee County, no precinct climbed above 28 percent for, the map shows.

The Atlanta District was one of nine Georgia regions to reject the tax; in the other three—the Central Savannah River District, the River Valley District and the Heart of Georgia District—it passed by just a few percentage points in each, the Atlanta Business Chronicle reports.

Here's the breakdown of how metro Atlanta counties voted:

COUNTYYESNOTOTAL Cherokee 9,105 (21%)
35,280 (79%)
44,385 Clayton 16,750 (46%)
19,303 (54%)
36,053 Cobb 38,703 (31%)
85,412 (69%)
124,115 DeKalb 57,915 (48%)
61,792 (52%)
119,707 Douglas 6,383 (32%)
13,534 (68%)
19,917 Fayette 6,677 (24%)
21,712 (76%)
28,389 Fulton 69,064 (49%)
72,365 (51%)
141,429 
Gwinnett 28,884 (29%)
70,273 (71%)
99,157 Henry 9,405 (29%)
23,371 (71%)
32,776 Rockdale 5,433 (30%)
12,484 (70%)
17,917

Total:

248,319 (37%)

415,526 (63%)

663,845

Mel Krupnick August 09, 2012 at 06:37 PM
I lived in a suburb of New York City for many years and commuted there to work. How it was handled in NYC seemed like a reasonable approach. There was a NYC Resident surcharge on the NYS Income tax for NYC Residents, while those who worked in the city but lived out of the city paid a NYC Non-resident surcharge (yes, a tax). The non-resident tax many years ago was under 1% at the time, while the resident tax was about 3.5% I believe. Either way, it meant that those who earned more, paid more and NYC could maintain the infrastructure to allow those from the suburbs to get there so they could work there.

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